Jacob Zuma Net Worth

Jacob Zuma Net Worth

Net Worth: $20 Million
Source of wealth:

Politician

Full Name Jacob Gedleyihlekisa Zuma
Birth Place Nkandla, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
Date of Birth Apr 12, 1942 (age 74)
Nationality South African
Ethnicity South African (Zulu)
Occupation Politician
Height
Weight
Marital Status Married (Four wives)
Children 20 (estimated)
Education No formal education
Hobbies Playing chess
Last Updated
Aug 24, 2015
Rank
#1

About Jacob Gedleyihlekisa Zuma

Jacob Zuma Net WorthBorn in Inkandia, South Africa in 1942. South African politician and current President of South Africa Jacob Zuma has an estimated net worth of $20 million. He is also the highest-paid African president with an annual salary of $270,000.

Zuma was elected as president back in 2009 and won last-year re-election. He is also the president of his political party, the African National Congress, a position he has occupied for almost eight years now. From 1999 until 2005, he served as the Deputy President of South Africa. In his early years, Zuma became a member of the African National Congress, which was then prohibited by the country’s government. He was arrested and convicted of conspiring to oust the government and was sent to serve behind bars on Robben Island for a decade, with Nelson Mandela being one of his fellow inmates. Zuma covertly re-founded the ANC following his release from prison. As president, Zuma has backed leftist economic policies. Considered the least educated African president, Zuma political legacy has been undermined with controversies. He was charged and then acquitted of rape in 2005, and four years later, the National Prosecuting Authority decided to drop charges against him for corrupting and racketeering. Those allegations resulted from the conviction of his financial advisor on charges of fraud and corruption. He has been married six times. Currently he has four wives: Gertrude Sizakele Khumalo, Nompumelelo Ntuli, Thobeka Mabhija, and Gloria Bongekile Ngema. He is said to have about 20 children.

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